teams

The Jolt That Jump Started the Momentum

Have you ever had one of those days where you dream about the future?

Maybe you had one of those moments talking with a trusted friend where the conversations turns to what could be and your heart starts to beat a little faster. You mind races as you bounce back and forth imagining what life would be like if we could just ______________. 

 

Unfortunately, as I’ve talked with pastors and church leaders, I’ve noticed one huge, discouraging problem! 

 

This problem plagues both organizations and individuals. 

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If you’re like me, the decade markers of our lives tend to be the moments when we evaluate our progress to date. Some people have panic attacks, others have a mid-life crisis. I landed somewhere in between. I was having a fair amount of success in my job (not in the church) but wasn’t having the kind of impact I had always imagined my life would have. I was working hard, enjoying my life but I wasn’t making any progress towards anything that remotely resembled my “life’s work”. My own life was plagued with the same, huge, discouraging problem. 

 

So, what was the huge problem I saw?

 

The problem can actually be separated into two equally important parts.

 

1. No clear, actionable plan to move toward the dream. 

More often then not, the dream of the future is much clearer than the steps to get there. That’s probably because dreaming is the easier part. Working out an actionable plan means working through a truckload of variables. It requires the ability to uncover what’s most important and which steps require priority. It requires a clear understanding of the current situation, as well as, what’s happened in the past. 

It commonly requires some type of change management, which undoubtedly requires conviction and focused energy. 

Teams need more than emotional enthusiasm; they need solid planning and strategy that empowers and executes the vision.
— Tony Morgan

That potential for conflict can stop any sort of actionable plan dead in its tracks. 

An aggressive actionable plan requires an appropriate amount of tolerance for risk and ambiguity, matched with the right timing, level of details, understood variables and defined tasks. None of which all come naturally to one person and therefore require some level of healthy conflict. 

 

2. No jolt, to break you from your current reality.

A jolt is most often the required ingredient for teams to overcome the fear of conflict.  That event that can serve as a catalyst to open the planning process and present the need for immediate action. 

Better yet, an external guide to help the process can help the team move beyond personalities. An outsider, who doesn’t, as they say, have a horse in the game can provide an unbiased focal point for your discussion and planning.  

A couple of years back, our church hit a turning point by going through this exact type of process. We hired an outside organization to walk us through a process that would point us toward a much clearer path moving forward. Starting with a two-day offsite (a jolt) we spent the following year moving through a clear actionable plan. Not only did we have a map to follow, we now had a taste for clarity and focus.  

 

Why I became StratOp certified.

 

That experience is precisely why I became StratOp certified. It has always been a passion and a calling of mine to help those I care about find clarity and purpose in what they do. The StratOp process provided the clarity and longevity to accelerate that impact. It’s why I now offer a Lead Forward process based on the Strategic Operating plan pioneered by the Paterson Center over the last 30 years. 

 
 

Leading forward to the dream and vision you have for your church’s future means is what you were meant to do. Don’t stay still and grow stale, jump forward and lead your church to the next level. 

7 Myths Uncovered About Church Planter Assessments

I was a huge skeptic. A new friend told me we needed to consider sending our newest potential campus pastor through a church planter assessment. I scoffed at the idea. I already knew our guy was awesome. Why would I go and spend a few thousand dollars just to confirm what I already knew? What a waste of money!

Thankfully my friend is a persuasive person. He encouraged me to, at very least, observe and I caved. With my arms crossed, I jumped on a plane to Vegas to watch an assessment in action. 

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As much as I hate fulfilling any stereotype, I was a HUGE one. I’m sure there were several people who heard me describe how we were “different” and I wasn’t sure this would work in our situation. Without a doubt, every other experienced assessor was just being polite as they waited for me to come around.  

And throughout our experience with assessments, we’ve uncovered 7 myths about church planter assessments.

  1. Assessments are only for church planters. //
    While the assessment is primarily targeted at church planters, it covers skills and competencies I believe all key staff members should have. It is common to see church planters, worship leaders, campus pastors, and various other staff hires attending assessment. For example, not every staff member will be pitching a missions board asking for money, but talking about money in a clear, professional, compelling manner is a valuable skill no matter what role you fill. 

  2. They won’t understand how church works in my region. They have no idea how we do things here. We are different! //
    You’re not that different. Your context might be, but leadership is leadership no matter where in the world you find yourself. Character and teamwork don’t change depending on which ocean you’re looking at. And if there are regional differences, the best assessments have someone from that team to help answer questions and provide perspective. 

  3. The people closest to our candidate have already validated their calling, why do we need the opinion of strangers? //
    I struggled with this at first, but it wasn’t long before I got nervous that I wanted our candidate to succeed because I like him. We had already been on a ministry journey together and I quickly feared this may cloud my judgment. Having a respected group of strangers take an analytical and experienced look at any candidate can help you validate things you weren’t 100% confident with, while also providing advice you wouldn’t otherwise have access to. A group of experienced assessors have no “sunk costs” with a candidate. They don’t have preconceived ideas about who a candidate is, or who they know. All they can see is the candidate in front of them. 

  4. They are too expensive. //
    Imagine this. You make a bad hire. How much have you spent on salary before you realize it? How long before you do something about it?  If we're going to spend 10 of thousands of dollars on this individual over the next year, a few thousand to make sure we’ve got a solid game plan is probably worth it. 

  5. How are you going to judge our candidate? They don’t even know him/her! //
    But they will. The goal going into each assessment is to deeply understand what makes each candidate unique. The best assessments encourage you or someone from your team to participate in the process to help provide a more intimate understanding of what makes each candidate unique. 

  6. Aren’t they just measuring me against a cookie cutter recipe? //
    Nope! They really are not. Every candidate is an individual and the goal of a great assessment is to give individualized specific feedback and coaching. The goal isn’t checking all the boxes on the checklist. It’s helping each unique child of God discover their best, most God-honoring next step. 

  7. Fine, but why is their spouse coming? //
    "If I'm the one in the designated ministry role, why does my spouse need to participate in the assessment?” is a question I think many candidates wrestle with. Especially those coming from larger churches. What we know about marriages is that they are a team. What happens to one effects the other. Not only does a spouse provide some perspective, but who else would you want on the journey with you. While not every spouse will be energized by the experience, they provide such a unique and powerful impact on the future, I can’t think of any other way to replicate. Trying to reach a God-given potential without them seems like it isn't possilbe...or healthy. 

I’d encourage you to consider sending your next church planter, campus pastor or staff hire through an assessment. Better yet, I’d encourage you to go with them. I’m willing to bet you walk away completely convinced that this will be an incredibly useful tool in your ministry tool belt. 


You can find more about the assessment we use on the Stadia Church Planting website

3 Skills to Teach as You Develop New Communicators

Is your church developing new communicators or are you hoping young communicators will cut their teeth at someone else’s church? I’ve you’ve lost any sleep over your church’s leadership pipeline you probably realize the importance of building your own farm team. 

Realizing the needed to grow more high capacity leaders from within our church we started a residency program. What I think has been most invigorating about this process has been realizing the untapped potential that exists among the people we already know. 

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The question is, what do you focus on? We can’t just expect that their “get it” right out of the gate.

As you begin to develop these new preachers there are 3 skills you need to pass on to them during their growth process. 

  1. Choosing scripture: 
    How do you choose the scripture you will be preaching from? Your new communicators may assume that these magically appear. I’m only half kidding. If they’ve never had to do this before they will not have had to develop the skill necessary to consider the entirety of scripture. They most likely have been working from a prescribed text, whether that was assigned or determined by a curriculum. Spend some time explaining how you came to the decision to use the specific text you are planning to use for a given weekend. 
     
  2. Unpacking Scripture: 
    How do you approach the task of “unpacking" that scripture? While the idea of biblical interpretation may come naturally to you now, it wasn’t always that way. As you begin to look at a text, ask them what they think the text is communicating. Then ask, “How do you think the author felt writing these words?” “What was the context he was communicating from?” Then, to get an even deeper understanding, “What was this text communicating to the original recipients?” 
     
  3. Addressing Your Audience: 
    What makes your audience different? Teach them how to speak to your specific audience. What style are they already used to? Who makes up your audience? How does that affect how and what you teach? 

These three skills will be routine to you, but likely new to any developing communicators. Spend the time on these three basics to help them get a solid foundation as they grow as preachers. 

And if you’re looking for some tools to help you through this process, check out Preaching Backwards. An eCourse that uses 6 simple questions to add more value to your next message. They will help you:

  • Speak in a way that encourages your audience to respond. 
  • Sharpen your call to action
  • And, give you a framework to develop new communicators while minimizing your leadership risks.

6 Simple Questions

6 simple questions to help clarify your message. Because if your message isn't crystal clear, how can your audience put it into action? 

Check out the Preaching Backwards eCourse available completely for free. It will walk you through 6 questions that will transform your Preaching Preparation into a more efficient and more powerful message.